Early Head Start serves pregnant women and children from birth to age three and their families.  All Early Head Start program options provide information, resources and referrals around the full array of early education, health, parenting, family service supports, and services to children with special needs.

The goals for EHS are to promote healthy prenatal outcomes for pregnant women, to enhance the physical, social, emotional, and intellectual development of children, and to support parents in moving toward self-sufficiency and overall wellness.

Preschool Landing Page

Head Start serves children age’s three to five and their families.  All Head Start program options provide information, resources and referrals around the full array of early education, health, parenting, family service supports, and services to children with special needs.

The goals of Head Start are to promote children’s social competence and school readiness by enhancing the social, cognitive, physical and emotional development of children, and to support parents in moving toward self-sufficiency and overall wellness.

Services for Children

Head Start and Early Head Start are federally-funded, national child and family development programs which provide comprehensive services for pregnant women, children birth to age five, and their families.  There are Head Start programs in all 50 states, in almost every county in the U.S.  Head Start serves more than 900,000 low-income children and families on an annual basis nationwide. Head Start was started in 1965 as part of President Lyndon Johnson’s War on Poverty and is administered by the Office of Head Start within the U.S. Administration for Children and Families (ACF), U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS).  In 1994, the Secretary of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services formed an Advisory Committee on Services for Families with Infants and Toddlers to design EHS, and the program was launched in 1995.

Head Start is a direct, federal-to-local program administered by more than 1,600 locally-based public or private organizations (called “grantees”) across the country.  Local programs are funded and monitored directly by the federal government.